Saturday, 5 March 2016

ARC Review: Seven Ways We Lie by Riley Redgate

Seven Ways We Lie (ARC)
By: Riley Redgate
Pages: 352
Published: March 8th, 2016
Published by: Amulet Books
Format: e-book
Source: NetGalley
My Rating: 4.5/5 stars

Sypnosis:
"Paloma High School is ordinary by anyone’s standards. It’s got the same cliques, the same prejudices, the same suspect cafeteria food. And like every high school, every student has something to hide—whether it’s Kat, the thespian who conceals her trust issues onstage; or Valentine, the neurotic genius who’s planted the seed of a school scandal.

When that scandal bubbles over, and rumors of a teacher-student affair surface, everyone starts hunting for someone to blame. For the unlikely allies at the heart of it all, the collision of their seven ordinary-seeming lives results in extraordinary change."

Add SEVEN WAYS WE LIE on Goodreads right here!

I received an advanced reader's copy from ABRAMS Kids and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

It's taken me a while to form my thoughts on this one. I loved it, but not until the story got moving. That is when the characters started jumping out to me, when their motivations and feelings and thoughts became like my own and I was feeling them. And with this, I rate Seven Ways We Lie with 4.5/5 stars.

Seven Ways We Lie was one of those books that I requested on NetGalley and thought I had no chance of being approved for. Low and behold, I got approved and I was really excited to read it because it was a pretty popular debut at the time on Twitter. However, as much as I loved the premise, it was still a contemporary. Contemporaries and I don't often get along and I would read some and put it off for a while and then come back to it. But once I started getting into it and everything started to click, I was hooked, and absolutely could not stop (with the exception of English class where the teacher caught me and yeah).

The thing that might put you off is the fact that there are indeed seven points of view this story is told from, but it was so distinctly done that each of the characters have their own voices and their own motives that it really never felt like too many. Redgate's execution in this manner was perfect as was the characterizations of the seven sins each character was supposed to represent. While at times I was confused as to which sin was who, eventually I was able to figure it all out and, let me tell you, it was pretty much spot-on. I have to say I was constantly comparing to the seven sins from Fullmetal Alchemist because they are awesome in terms of characterization, and I was not disappointed by Redgate's characterization.

Another thing I loved about this book was the fact that the characters are all so diverse. There are characters who are latino, pansexual, and those with social anxiety. Redgate brought forms of these issues and addressed well throughout the book. It was a pleasure reading from their different voices. Juniper's chapters were written in poetry form, and Valentine's perspective was so smart and straightforward, and Matt's was full of deep thoughts which all properly reflect their characters.

The only problem I really had with this book was the way the student-teacher relationship was handled. I mean isn't a bit hard to mistaken a teenager for someone older? Or maybe figure out that if you are a teacher, that the fact that you might have them as a student, if they are younger, a bit likely? If this issue was addressed beforehand, none of this drama would have happened and everything would have been okay. It seems a bit like of a plothole for me, but I wasn't too worried about because not everything in this book was about this crisis.

Final Verdict:
Seven Ways We Lie was an excellent high school contemporary dealing with love, family, and trust. Seven interconnected teens trying to figure their way through the hard stuff was understandable and totally relatable. Another great debut of 2016, please go read it.

SEVEN WAYS WE LIE releases on March 8th, 2016.
 

2 comments:

  1. I've heard so many good things about this book! It sounds amazing about how much representation it has - it's something so important. I'm not sure if the concept really appeals to me though... I'm not sure how I feel about student/teacher relationships, especially because you said they weren't handled too well. I'm worried the POVs might confuse me too!

    Denise | The Bibliolater

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    1. It was a really great book overall! The student/teacher relationship wasn't super horrible, it was mostly how it was ignorant to the teacher and student that there was this conflict in the first place? Like it's hard to describe without giving it away, but they both met outside of school so it wasn't so much an in-school relationship as it was was a coincidence that it happened. Definitely don't worry about the POVs! They were all written distinctly for anyone to follow! I really hope you decide to pick it up!

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